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Getting Clear on the Economic Facts During a Career Change

San Francisco, CA (Vocus/PRWEB), April 28, 2010

It’s a topic that hits home for countless Americans dealing with economic uncertainty right now: how to make a meaningful career change. Many people are looking for practical advice on how they can best adapt to the changing economy to advance in their present career or get a job in a new one.

Communications expert David Cunningham of Landmark Education was recently interviewed by Random House author and Wall Street Journal columnist Alexandra Levit. They talked about how a change in perspective can provide the keys for people to get “unstuck” and launch a new career. 
Levit, author of New Job, New You: A Guide to Reinventing Yourself in a Bright New Career, says: “A lot of people are feeling very stuck in this current climate. Either they're in a job that they feel is not personally meaningful or they're just not sure what the next step is to take.” 

Cunningham outlined some tips for career changers to give them power and explore their opportunities. He explained that people tend to confuse the facts of their situation with their interpretations of those facts. He suggested people make two lists: one with the facts of their situation, and the other with whatever thoughts they may have added. Facts might include things like salary and opportunities for promotion. Added thoughts might include “I’m not successful enough,” “We’re going to have trouble paying our bills,” or “I’m not going to be able to retire.” 

"When you go to work on just the facts versus what you add to them, you get a lot of power," Cunningham says. 

David Cunningham is a communications expert and seminar leader for Landmark Education, a personal and professional growth, training and development company that's had more than 1.2 million people use its programs to cause breakthroughs in their personal lives as well as in their communities, generating more than 100,000 community projects around the world. In The Landmark Forum, Landmark’s flagship program, people cause breakthroughs in their performance, communication, relationships and overall satisfaction in life. For more information and other tools for career changers, please visit www.landmarkeducation.com.