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How to Tell a Loved One "I'm Angry" Wall Street Journal features Landmark Education

San Francisco, CA (Vocus/PRWEB), May 31, 2011

With the additional “together time” that comes with summer vacations, graduations and family reunions, there are bound to be some disagreements, arguments and upsets as well as fun and celebration. A recent article in The Wall Street Journal explains how to communicate in upsetting situations to keep relationships strong.

“For 20 years, Dr. Nancy Zapolski, a psychologist and Vice President at Landmark Education, a San Francisco-based personal-development firm, has taught people how to communicate —rather than let angry feelings fester — in seminars and courses,” the article states.

Zapolski leads a course called The Landmark Forum offered by Landmark Education, a personal and professional growth, training and development company that’s had more than 1.3 million people use its programs to cause breakthroughs in their performance, communication, relationships and overall satisfaction in life (http://www.LandmarkEducation.com).

Before telling someone you are angry, remind yourself of the purpose of speaking up, the article states. “Ask yourself: Why am I really mad? What expectations did I have that weren't met? What did I want to happen that didn't happen?” Zapolski says. “The answers will help you better understand your feelings and focus on what you need to say.”

The article also features a brother and sister who once fought constantly but resolved their differences after participating in The Landmark Forum. By putting into practice the communication tools they learned, they were able to express upsets in a way that could be heard – and rationally responded to – by the other person.

"The intention is not to get something off your chest or to dump something on the other person," Zapolski says. "The intention is to restore the affinity and the love in the relationship."

Landmark Education is marking its 20th anniversary this year. The company has been featured extensively in the press, including an article in the March 7 issue of TIME Magazine and two articles last year in The New York Times. 

(Visit Landmark's website – http://www.landmarkeducation.com/articles_about_landmark_education.jsp
 – to see dozens of articles and broadcasts).  

People who have participated in Landmark Education programs have created a website that features stories about projects and initiatives created out of Landmark's programs. To see these stories, visithttp://www.landmarkeducationnews.info.